Is In-Browser Mining a Good or Bad Use Case for Cryptocurrency?

Source : Is In-Browser Mining a Good or Bad Use Case for Cryptocurrency? You may not even know it, but the chances are that one of the websites you visited today using a browser may have used your phone or laptop to mine cryptocurrency. Mining of cryptocurrencies is not something that is new, even if the majority may not know how it is done or even heard about it. Every cryptocurrency uses blockchain technology as its backbone. The blockchain is a ledger that records new transactions called as blocks. Whenever a new block is detected on the network, miners compete with each other and by using the proof of work concept try solving it. Miners are suitably paid in cryptocurrency as a reward. Mining bitcoin, or for that matter any other cryptocurrency, requires computational power. When Bitcoin was launched in 2009, the early miners could mine bitcoin by using the computational power of their desktop or laptop. However, as more miners joined this network, they came with much better and more powerful CPUs. At one point, it was no longer profitable to mine bitcoin on home desktops. After that, certain specialized chips called ASICs were introduced to be used for mining. Expensive chips also require more electricity consumption. Hence, mining cryptocurrencies are getting more expensive regarding energy. The problem has also resulted in a new dilemma, of how to get even more CPUs to increase the computational power for mining. The Rise of In-browser Mining As a monetization strategy, some developers decided to use your device’s processing capacity to mine cryptocurrencies. Some websites are now running JavaScript code in your web browser that enables them to run certain programs without the notice of the user. However, not all cryptocurrencies can be successfully mined on commonly found lesser powerful devices. Monero is the most popular cryptocurrency that is unlinkable, ASIC-resistant and completely reliant on CPU and GPU mining. Mining monero is fast and simple and does not require any dedicated computing power. In September 2017, it was reported that Shownet websites were secretly using user CPU to mine cryptocurrencies. The websites were using a crypto mining JavaScript script known as Coinhive. Coinhive was developed as a solution for websites to monetize their content without advertisements while also ensuring that revenue was not compromised. According to technology experts though, there are several agencies misusing this and mining monero on others devices without their knowledge. Benefits and Costs of In-browser Mining Karl Sigler, who is one of the tech security experts at Chicago’s Trustwave, warned, “What we’re seeing in that crypto jacking can actually raise the individual users’ electric bill to $3 to $5 a month just by visiting a website that is using this crypto mining. And that may not seem like a lot, but when we’re talking about large organizations or large enterprises that have maybe have 100s to 1000s of computers, each one of them if they hit a crypto jacking website, that can really add up a lot.” This …

Plus…Is In-Browser Mining a Good or Bad Use Case for Cryptocurrency?

ICOs Have Raised $2 Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales

Source : ICOs Have Raised Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales Crowdfunding Despite the quality of this year’s initial crowd offerings being patchy at best, investors’ appetite for them remains unsated. $2 billion has been raised already, placing 2018 on course to comfortably surpass 2017’s total of $5.7 billion. But with the structure of these sales now geared increasingly towards private investors, the public have been left to fight for the scraps. Data shows that 84% of all ICO fundraising this year has come from private and presales. Also read: Crypto Index Fund Bitwise Delivers 45% Return in First Two Months Private Sales Are Helping the Rich Get Richer When crowdsales first emerged, they were presented as a democratic means of raising funds and creating a diverse, engaged community. For a while, that’s more or less how it played out, but in 2018 the ICO landscape has changed. Last year, private investors still got first dibs on the best crowdsales – BAT was notorious for selling out in minutes after a handful of whales took their fill of tokens – but this year, the public sale is almost an afterthought. All the action is taking place at the pre- and private stage, leaving slim pickings for the crowds. Recent figures released by Tokendata show that of the $1.97 billion invested in ICOs this year, $1.63 billion – or 84% – went to private investors. Moreover, this data doesn’t take into account the reported $850 million being raised in the Telegram private sale, an event so exclusive that only the biggest of the big shots are invited. Telegram’s $600 million pre-sale finishes at the end of February, but already investors are supposedly flipping their token allocation for as much as 2x. Projects such as this are good for helping the rich get richer, but they fail to give the platform’s users a stake in the project. ICOs Dispense Modest Gains Of the 94 ICOs Tokendata has been tracking this year, 28 now have tokens available for trading on exchanges. At this stage, the average ROI for tokens purchased via ICO and sold on an exchange is a mere 2.17x, and the return on ETH is just 0.75x. In other words, it would have been more profitable in many cases to hold onto ether since the start of the year than it would have been to swap it for tokens. It’s still early days of course, and there’s plenty of time for the crop of 2018 to come good. Thanks to the generous discounts applied during pre-sales, it’s a lot easier for private investors to turn a profit than it is for public sale participants. Moreover, with pre-sale tokens often ending up on decentralized exchanges immediately, the role of the public sale has been relegated to a footnote. On paper, crowdsales are more popular than ever. But in reality, their biggest benefactors are the 1% with the connections and the capital to profit. Do you think it’s unhealthy for ICO tokens …

Plus…ICOs Have Raised $2 Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales

ICOs Have Raised $2 Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales

Source : ICOs Have Raised Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales Crowdfunding Despite the quality of this year’s initial crowd offerings being patchy at best, investors’ appetite for them remains unsated. $2 billion has been raised already, placing 2018 on course to comfortably surpass 2017’s total of $5.7 billion. But with the structure of these sales now geared increasingly towards private investors, the public have been left to fight for the scraps. Data shows that 84% of all ICO fundraising this year has come from private and presales. Also read: Crypto Index Fund Bitwise Delivers 45% Return in First Two Months Private Sales Are Helping the Rich Get Richer When crowdsales first emerged, they were presented as a democratic means of raising funds and creating a diverse, engaged community. For a while, that’s more or less how it played out, but in 2018 the ICO landscape has changed. Last year, private investors still got first dibs on the best crowdsales – BAT was notorious for selling out in minutes after a handful of whales took their fill of tokens – but this year, the public sale is almost an afterthought. All the action is taking place at the pre- and private stage, leaving slim pickings for the crowds. Recent figures released by Tokendata show that of the $1.97 billion invested in ICOs this year, $1.63 billion – or 84% – went to private investors. Moreover, this data doesn’t take into account the reported $850 million being raised in the Telegram private sale, an event so exclusive that only the biggest of the big shots are invited. Telegram’s $600 million pre-sale finishes at the end of February, but already investors are supposedly flipping their token allocation for as much as 2x. Projects such as this are good for helping the rich get richer, but they fail to give the platform’s users a stake in the project. ICOs Dispense Modest Gains Of the 94 ICOs Tokendata has been tracking this year, 28 now have tokens available for trading on exchanges. At this stage, the average ROI for tokens purchased via ICO and sold on an exchange is a mere 2.17x, and the return on ETH is just 0.75x. In other words, it would have been more profitable in many cases to hold onto ether since the start of the year than it would have been to swap it for tokens. It’s still early days of course, and there’s plenty of time for the crop of 2018 to come good. Thanks to the generous discounts applied during pre-sales, it’s a lot easier for private investors to turn a profit than it is for public sale participants. Moreover, with pre-sale tokens often ending up on decentralized exchanges immediately, the role of the public sale has been relegated to a footnote. On paper, crowdsales are more popular than ever. But in reality, their biggest benefactors are the 1% with the connections and the capital to profit. Do you think it’s unhealthy for ICO tokens …

Plus…ICOs Have Raised $2 Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales

ICOs Have Raised $2 Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales

Source : ICOs Have Raised Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales Despite the quality of this year’s initial crowd offerings being patchy at best, investors’ appetite for them remains unsated. $2 billion has been raised already, placing 2018 on course to comfortably surpass 2017’s total of $5.7 billion. But with the structure of these sales now geared increasingly towards private investors, the public have been left to fight for the scraps. Data shows that 84% of all ICO fundraising this year has come from private and presales. Also read: Crypto Index Fund Bitwise Delivers 45% Return in First Two Months Private Sales Are Helping the Rich Get Richer When crowdsales first emerged, they were presented as a democratic means of raising funds and creating a diverse, engaged community. For a while, that’s more or less how it played out, but in 2018 the ICO landscape has changed. Last year, private investors still got first dibs on the best crowdsales – BAT was notorious for selling out in minutes after a handful of whales took their fill of tokens – but this year, the public sale is almost an afterthought. All the action is taking place at the pre- and private stage, leaving slim pickings for the crowds. Recent figures released by Tokendata show that of the $1.97 billion invested in ICOs this year, $1.63 billion – or 84% – went to private investors. Moreover, this data doesn’t take into account the reported $850 million being raised in the Telegram private sale, an event so exclusive that only the biggest of the big shots are invited. Telegram’s $600 million pre-sale finishes at the end of February, but already investors are supposedly flipping their token allocation for as much as 2x. Projects such as this are good for helping the rich get richer, but they fail to give the platform’s users a stake in the project. ICOs Dispense Modest Gains Of the 94 ICOs Tokendata has been tracking this year, 28 now have tokens available for trading on exchanges. At this stage, the average ROI for tokens purchased via ICO and sold on an exchange is a mere 2.17x, and the return on ETH is just 0.75x. In other words, it would have been more profitable in many cases to hold onto ether since the start of the year than it would have been to swap it for tokens. It’s still early days of course, and there’s plenty of time for the crop of 2018 to come good. Thanks to the generous discounts applied during pre-sales, it’s a lot easier for private investors to turn a profit than it is for public sale participants. Moreover, with pre-sale tokens often ending up on decentralized exchanges immediately, the role of the public sale has been relegated to a footnote. On paper, crowdsales are more popular than ever. But in reality, their biggest benefactors are the 1% with the connections and the capital to profit. Do you think it’s unhealthy for ICO tokens to …

Plus…ICOs Have Raised $2 Billion This Year – Mostly from Private Sales

No, Not All ICOs Are Securities

Source : No, Not All ICOs Are Securities Paul Paray is an attorney in Allendale, New Jersey, focused on privacy and technology matters.In his Feb. 8 opinion piece for CoinDesk, Santander’s Julio Faura suggests that “utility tokens are a bad idea” because it would be a “lie to ourselves” to suggest initial coin offerings (ICOs) were not actually selling securities.Rather, in Faura’s opinion “we should collectively work on a framework to build a clearly defined scheme for ICOs, recognizing from the very beginning that they are securities.” And, this “ICO process should be designed in collaboration with regulators to comply with securities law.”Faura’s opinion piece does not exist in a vacuum.  In a report dated Feb. 5, Goldman Sachs’ global head of investment research suggests that investors in ICOs could possibly lose their entire investments – which ties to Faura’s underlying premise that ICOs should be regulated “to protect investors.” It is not clear how his proposed hybrid solution would ever get implemented, given it requires complete buy-in from capital markets and regulators, so it would be a non-starter from day one.Why would existing financial institutions and regulators scuttle existing methods of raising capital or attempt to squeeze ICOs under traditional securities law, even if considered a sale of securities?Answer: They would not. Ripple – a company partially funded by Santander InnoVentures – offers a glimpse of how traditional banks and financial markets will compete using blockchain technology and “coins.”Faura’s opinion piece paints all ICOs with the same brush by claiming each one of them actually offers securities subject to U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC) scrutiny.  That is simply not the case.Indeed, does Faura wonder why the SEC has not knocked on Ripple’s XRP “digital asset” door? Even though there was no formal ICO to launch that arguably centralized token, it now trades on 18 exchanges where individuals can buy the XRP coin. Indeed, after raising nearly $94 million of venture capital, Ripple probably does not need an ICO.One ICO left untouched by the SEC was “gate-keeped” by the law firm of Perkins Coie and involved the sale of a utility token that raised $35 million in under a minute’s time.  Brave’s token creates a digital advertising ecosystem tied to consumer attention – which is why it is dubbed the Basic Attention Token. Such an ecosystem would certainly be an upgrade from the current digital advertising scheme wedded to the web ecosystem of 1995.Reasonable regulationAll told, it seems that the SEC and other regulatory bodies have actually taken a very measured approach in this area – aggressively focusing on obvious fraudsters first in order to deter subsequent fraudsters, while letting the technology play out a bit in the wild.Not surprisingly, the plaintiff’s bar has been doing a good job picking up the slack in those instances when the SEC has not yet moved. See Davy v. Paragon Coin, Inc., et al., Case No. 18-cv-00671 (N.D. Cal. January 30, 2018) and Paige v. Bitconnect Intern. PLC, et al., Case No. 3:18-CV-58-JHM (W.D. …

Plus…No, Not All ICOs Are Securities

Try the Brave Browser and Give Brave Payments a Go

Source : Try the Brave Browser and Give Brave Payments a Go We have been following the new Brave browser that promises to give you better and safer browsing experience by blocking ads and trackers and revolutionize the way people support their favorite websites and Youtubers. We have been following the development of the browser and the evolution of the Brave Payments for quite a while now and this blog has been a verified Brave publisher for almost a year now. Unfortunately based on our experience it seems that Brave does need a lot of work in making their Brave Payments feature really usable and the tokens available in the hands of many people in order for them to use them. It is not that the company hasn’t been trying to do so, it just seems that there is much more work still left to do based on our own experience. For almost a year being part of the Brave movement we have received a staggering 2.07 BAT tokens as contribution form our readers, something we are thankful for, but at less than a dollar value total it is hardly something that can help us remove traditional ads for now… The latest effort by Brave to promote their browser is targeted at content creators such as us that can promote the Brave browser to their readers and possibly get some more tokens in return if the users keep using the software. So if you have not yet tried the Brave browser you might want to give it a go and if you like it (it is free after all and works very well) you may also support us this way. – To give the Brave browser a try and to check out the Brave Payments feature…

How To Mine Smartcash?

Source : How To Mine Smartcash? [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Sh8P74Qs2Dg&w=700&h=394] Smartcash will be huge soon, they have a very helpful and great community which will guide you on mining this coin using Windows, using anAMD GPU which will be the same process for Nvidia and just use the respective miner for Nvida and anything like steps and the same process with the other. At the moment, this coin is just a solo mining only space. This implies that you will just be mining using your own wallet and that means using the Smartcash wallet, with a tweak of Smartcash.conf settings and SGMiner. STEP 1 : Download your wallet on this link https://smartcash.cc/get-smartcash/ and just make it run for it to be able to update its settings with the current block. STEP 2 : Step two, download the SGminer variant need to mine this coin https://github.com/genesismining/sgminer-gm/releases at the time of this post current version is SGminer GM 5.5.5 simply extract the zip, then goto the folder. You will have to edit the « start.bat » file with the credentials necessary for it to be working properly. It should be a one line code that looks like this, Change the -u parameter to a username of your choice and the then do the same for -P parameter as this is your password that you choose, do not share these details with anyone. once you are done save and exit. STEP 3 : Time to join the miner with the wallet and make it work, go to the following path on your computer C:UsersyourusernameAppDataRoamingsmartcash change yourusername to your computer user name. even if you cannot see the AppData path as it is defaul hiddden in Windows 10, you can goto the path by typing it in. Once you have gotten to the smartcash path, we need to creat a .conf file, which will have the setting we need to make the wallet work with the gpu miner as a server. The easiest way is to copy a .conf file from the SGminer directory, then edit it and rename, then you do not need to worry about trying to make one using notepad. So to do this we went to our SGminer path were our GPU miner is and copied the sgminer-xmr.conf file now we past this file into our C:UsersyourusernameAppDataRoamingsmartcash path, and edit the file by choosing open with and selecting notepad, make sure the tickbox is unselected we do not want this file associated with notepad. Once the file is open for edit we want to delete everything in it, and then add the following lines in only. server=1 daemon=1 rpcuser=yourusername rpcpassword=yourpassword rpcallowip=127.0.0.1 rpcport=9679 keypool=10000 Make sure to change the rpuser= to your username that you used in the SGminer setup and do the same for rpcpassword to the same password as used in the sgminer setup from above. Once the file is looking like the above, click save and exit. now select the file and rename it to smartcash it will now be smartcash.conf. Ok …

Plus…How To Mine Smartcash?

Blockchain Based Rewards Benefit Independent Content Creators

Source : Blockchain Based Rewards Benefit Independent Content Creators Independent content providers have a difficult path to earning a living from their work but some new Blockchain based reward networks are changing this.Content creators to get their dueAnyone who has spent years and countless hours developing independent content across multiple platforms knows how hard it is to actually generate any revenue from the work.While Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram rely on user-generated content the revenue that streams in from ads goes directly to the platform, only rarely dripping into the pockets of those who put the time and energy into drawing the traffic.Author and founder of Good Audience, Sherman Lee, believes decentralization and Blockchain ledger technology are a perfect combination to bridge this gap in creation and reimbursement.As she recently wrote in Forbes  ‘Every single piece of unique content could be recorded on the Blockchain along with impressions, likes, and comments. Content creators would have transparency into the impact they are making for brands or social networks and be properly rewarded for it.’Virtual rewards networks already exist and some of them are funneling revenue back to the original content creators.Blockchain-based rewards taking offSteemit allows content creators to be rewarded in STEEM tokens based on votes from users. These tokens can then be exchanged for fiat currency. The platform that started in March of 2016 has paid out $30 million to 50,000 users as of November 2017.The downside to Steemit is that users are only rewarded for content on that platform. All of the hard work a creator may have put into building their Twitter or Instagram feeds cannot be rewarded through this.Gifto, a Hong Kong-based rewards protocol, has solved this by allowing users to award virtual gifts across all platforms. These gifts can then be exchanged for GTO tokens which in turn can be exchanged for fiat currency. These gifts can be awarded on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or any social network platform.CEO of Asia Innovation Group creator of both Gifto and Uplive, a live streaming network in Asia, has been looking at gamification for a long time. He believes that virtual gifts are a way to keep users engaged and creators continuing to put out high quality and sometimes groundbreaking content. According to Asia Innovation Group Uplive generated over $100 million in revenue for content generators in 2017. Gifto will replace Uplive for 2018 and is projected to go over 300 Million in virtual gifts.There are other Blockchain based rewards networks out there such as the Basic Attention Token (BAT) which allow users of the browser to reward websites directly for their content using the BAT token. Irrespective of which one gains the greatest adoption the ultimate winner will be the independent content creators who have been traditionally left out of the revenue loop.

Blockchain Based Rewards Benefit Independent Content Creators

Source : Blockchain Based Rewards Benefit Independent Content Creators Independent content providers have a difficult path to earning a living from their work but some new Blockchain based reward networks are changing this. Content creators to get their due Anyone who has spent years and countless hours developing independent content across multiple platforms knows how hard it is to actually generate any revenue from the work. While Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram rely on user-generated content the revenue that streams in from ads goes directly to the platform, only rarely dripping into the pockets of those who put the time and energy into drawing the traffic. Author and founder of Good Audience, Sherman Lee, believes decentralization and Blockchain ledger technology are a perfect combination to bridge this gap in creation and reimbursement. As she recently wrote in Forbes  ‘Every single piece of unique content could be recorded on the Blockchain along with impressions, likes, and comments. Content creators would have transparency into the impact they are making for brands or social networks and be properly rewarded for it.’ Virtual rewards networks already exist and some of them are funneling revenue back to the original content creators. Blockchain-based rewards taking off Steemit allows content creators to be rewarded in STEEM tokens based on votes from users. These tokens can then be exchanged for fiat currency. The platform that started in March of 2016 has paid out $30 million to 50,000 users as of November 2017. The downside to Steemit is that users are only rewarded for content on that platform. All of the hard work a creator may have put into building their Twitter or Instagram feeds cannot be rewarded through this. Gifto, a Hong Kong-based rewards protocol, has solved this by allowing users to award virtual gifts across all platforms. These gifts can then be exchanged for GTO tokens which in turn can be exchanged for fiat currency. These gifts can be awarded on Facebook, Twitter, Instagram or any social network platform. CEO of Asia Innovation Group creator of both Gifto and Uplive, a live streaming network in Asia, has been looking at gamification for a long time. He believes that virtual gifts are a way to keep users engaged and creators continuing to put out high quality and sometimes groundbreaking content. According to Asia Innovation Group Uplive generated over $100 million in revenue for content generators in 2017. Gifto will replace Uplive for 2018 and is projected to go over 300 Million in virtual gifts. There are other Blockchain based rewards networks out there such as the Basic Attention Token (BAT) which allow users of the browser to reward websites directly for their content using the BAT token. Irrespective of which one gains the greatest adoption the ultimate winner will be the independent content creators who have been traditionally left out of the revenue loop. The post Blockchain Based Rewards Benefit Independent Content Creators appeared first on NewsBTC.

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